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‘Lonely Receiver #1’ (review)

Written by Zac Thompson
Art by Jen Hickman
Published by AfterShock Comics

 

Have you ever seen the TV series Black Mirror? It’s sort of a tech-related modern take on the Twilight Zone. The new comic, Lonely Receiver reminds me of a Black Mirror episode. A little too much, in fact.

Oh, Lonely Receiver has its good points—mainly some nicely done storytelling from artist Jen Hickman and writer Zac (no relation) Thompson.

But that’s only in spots, I’m afraid. For the most part, the whole thing is a little tricky to keep up with. I never did catch on to what was happening 100% in fact, just little snippets here and there.

While some of the dialogue is quite good, it just doesn’t all coalesce into telling a fully coherent story, or even, in this case, an introduction to one.

It’s something about this lonely woman at some point in the future who buys and “programs” an artificial life form to be her perfect companion.

The androgynous but seemingly outwardly female companion seems to take on some of the multidimensional aspects of Watchmen’s Dr. Manhattan, leading to some of the same relationship issues that Laurie had there.

The art and yes, once again, the coloring, is quite good, but for the confusing censorship of body parts of the companion character. Since none of the language is censored and there is a most unusual and fairly erotic sex scene, I was surprised at that seemingly purposeful move.

Overall, I was left intrigued…but not really enough to come back and try to figure out what’s going on again next time.

The fact that there’s an offensively and explicitly violent preview for another title from the publisher after the main story is also a turnoff.

In the end Lonely Receiver offers some good art and coloring, and some well-written dialogue, but all done in service to a confusing, derivative story. This could play better in the inevitable graphic novel collection but I reserve judgment until if and when.

For now, I can’t recommend Lonely Receiver.

 

 

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n’s Dr. Manhattan, leading to some of the same relationship issues that Laurie had there.

The art and yes, once again, the coloring, is quite good, but for the confusing censorship of body parts of the companion character. Since none of the language is censored and there is a most unusual and fairly erotic sex scene, I was surprised at that seemingly purposeful move.

Overall, I was left intrigued…but not really enough to come back and try to figure out what’s going on again next time.

The fact that there’s an offensively and explicitly violent preview for another title from the publisher after the main story is also a turnoff.

In the end Lonely Receiver offers some good art and coloring, and some well-written dialogue, but all done in service to a confusing, derivative story. This could play better in the inevitable graphic novel collection but I reserve judgment until if and when. For now, I can’t recommend Lonely Receiver.

 

 

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